Screenshots of Microsoft Windows Longhorn build 4051 (PDC) for IA64


#1

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#2

Nice work! Thanks for sharing these screenshots and the link to your site.

It shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone, who knows me, that Windows isn’t exactly my thing. But, I’ll admit, to see it run on an IA-64 system like an rx2600 and such a relatively unknown and rare release is quite interesting. You got quite far with DirectX, I found that very interesting. Do you think there’s a way to get it work to a certain degree of usability?

As for your point about censorship on the internet: You indeed shouldn’t have to worry here, your threads and posts will remain untouched. I and psx-dude (the kind administrator of this site and these forums) are definitely not control freaks and I certainly don’t want to throw away the time people invested to place their contributions.


#3

You got quite far with DirectX

Not far then usually, i just looked what there is in this build: what works and what’s not.

Do you think there’s a way to get it work to a certain degree of usability?

Kind of, since WoW64-translated x86 applications that rely on DirectX work, although i’ve never checked how this mechanism works in terms of translation: i.e. do translated applications are bridged to a native DirectX (for IA64) or there is a bunch of DirectX libs just moved from x86 version of Windows, since it’s relatively high-level runtime libraries.
If you see at this picture, DirectX 9 DLL is quite incomplete, usual WoW’ed application, the latest Skype (which relies on DirectX 9, versions up to 4.2 rely on DirectX 8 and work there) points that Skype is not able to get proc address of D3DPERF_SetOptions() (so GetProcAddress() failed by some reason?)
If you’re interesting in hardware acceleration of DirectX-based x86 (translated) application, that will not work, we already had discussed this few times, though OpenGL acceleration will work!

Since i don’t have any Win/IA64 big iron application, i don’t know if a native DirectX ever used (especially it’s 3D-related functions) by something. Luckily there is a Dependency Walker version for IA64, so it’s easy to figure if you have an .exe blob.


#4

I’m familiar with that information (and that particular matrix), but thanks for sharing it here. I thought that maybe with the Longhorn release there may have been more support in some areas; ultimately, I guess not.

I wonder what kind of native Windows IA-64 software is out there. The only things I personally know are Houdini of Side Effects Software, Inc. (with press releases about it still on their site, like this one), Microsoft SQL Server, Java Run-time Environment/Development Kit (still supported), 7-Zip, UltraDefrag, UltraVNC and other, mostly smaller, general purpose utilities. I guess that there were some competing SQL databases at some point, like Oracle, along with some CAD/CAE/CAM applications (like CATIA, Pro/ENGINEER, Solid Edge, NX and so forth). Overall that’s hard to say and finding lists of native software proves to be surprisingly difficult.


#5

There are probably no such lists (at least for small apps). Just to add more system-oriented general purpose software: It’s a corporate edition of Symantec Antivirus (most parts of software are native IA64 binaries) and enterprise version of SiSoftware Sandra (which requires Active Directory for installing :barf:). I don’t see a reason to list more, since at my opinion only commercial CAD/CAE/CAM or modeling software makes a sense there.


#6

I will keep everything going forward. I actually learned the hard way a few years ago by pruning the old database. So rest assured this will be here in some form in the future!


#7

What kind of database does vBulletin actually use? MySQL in a typical LAMP configuration, any decent/usable (read: whatever that is capable of playing ball with an HTTP server, PHP, etc.) SQL RDBMS or is it perhaps something proprietary?


#8

vBulletin is backed by MySQL.


#9

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#10

Nice OS, particularly games! You have any information about running it at something like my MK-90?


#11

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